Battle of Brown's Mill
Union Soldiers Killed in Action or Died in Area Hospitals
In June and July of 1867 the Federal Government removed bodies of soldiers, who were buried in
temporary graves around Newnan, vicinity of Corinth Road, and Philpot's Ferry GA., to their final
resting place at the Atlanta-Marietta National Cemetery. The list below was compiled from the US
Quartermaster's "Roll Of Honor", published 1869.
It has been estimated that hundreds of soldiers died at Brown's Mill and during the escape. Many
are probably buried still buried on or near the battlefield, and along the escape route.
Conzett, David, Pvt., 5th Iowa. Cav., Co. E., 7-31-1864, Newnan, GA.
Corlin, L.P., (Corbin, David S.) Pvt., 5th Iowa. Cav., Vicinity Newnan, GA.
Kenny, Micheal, Pvt., 2nd Kentucky Cav., Co. C., 7-30-1864, Near Newnan, GA.
Pullium, William H., Sgt., 8th Iowa Cav., Co. F., 7-31-1864, Newnan, GA.
Scott, James W., Pvt., 2nd Ind. Cav. Co. D., 8-15-1864, Near Newnan, GA.
Sperry, David, Pvt., 8th Ind. Cav., Co. B., Vicinity Philpot
's Ferry, GA
Torrey, William Henry, Lt. Col. 1st Wisconsin Cav., Commander McCook's 2nd Brigade,
Vicinity Newnan, GA.
Unknown, Philpot
's Ferry, GA.
Unknown, US Colored Troops, Vicinity Philpot
's Ferry, GA.
Unknown, Vicinity Newnan, GA.
Unknown, Vicinity Newnan, GA.
Unknown, Vicinity Newnan, GA.
Unknown, Vicinity Newnan, GA.
Unknown, Vicinity Philpot’s Ferry, GA
Wimberly, William, Pvt., 8th Iowa Cav., Co. I., 7-30-1864, Newnan, GA.
"Gentlemen, you can all surrender and be damned. I am
going out with my regiment. I would about as soon be killed
in the attempt, as to be captured and sent to Andersonville
or Libby."
               Colonel James Patton Brownlow, 1st Tennessee Cavalry,
US
      Unknown Union Soldier
                  Buried Heard Co. Georgia
  Near Escape Route From Battle Of Brown's Mill
This unknown soldier, fleeing from the Battle of Brown's Mill,
lost his horse during the skirmish at Philpot's Ferry. While on
foot, he found food and safety at the Jacob Brown Plantation
located south of Franklin. Jacob, a Confederate soldier, was
away in Virginia. The Brown family cared several days for the
soldier, but he became sick and later died. He was buried
outside the gate to the family garden.
The headstone was ordered by Edward Jordan Lanham and
installed  January 14, 2001 by Edward and Dr. Kerry Elliott.
  Unknown Union Soldier
            Buried Adamson Cemetery
         Glenn, Heard Co., Georgia
               On the Escape Route
    From The Battle Of Brown's Mill
This soldier actually died at a farmer's well, about a
half mile across the Alabama line. The farmer, who
owned the property where the soldier died, built a
casket from wood off his barn and buried him in
the local cemetery at Glenn. You will notice that
the grave has 2 slabs over it, as the poem below
required that much space.
"This dying man his friends had fled left to his foes not a word he said
Away from home away from friends and all that heart holds dear a
federal soldier buried here no earthly friends was near
His lips were closed his body frail his dying groans and face was
pale
Away from home away from friends and all that heart holds dear a
federal soldier buried here no earthly friends was near
The clothes he wore blue uniform his body showed not a mark of harm
Away from home away from friends and all that heart holds dear a
federal soldier buried here no earthly friends was near
His death occurred from unknown cause had a deathly stroke and
fell from a horse
Away from home away from friends and all that heart holds dear a
federal soldier buried here no earthly friends was near
His coffin rough and loosly laid of scraps of plank and they had
no nails
Away from home away from friends and all that heart holds dear a
federal soldier buried here no earthly frineds was near
The plank was off a nearby barn where federals robbed of its wheat
and corn".
by N.R. Adamson 5-30-1928 C.B.A.     
Edward Jordan Lanham
Click Here
To See Their Gravesites At Marietta National Cemetery, Marietta, GA.